a bell and a pomegranate

(a bell and a pomegranate.)

thegetty:


From you have I been absent in the spring, When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim, Hath put a spirit of youth in everything, That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him, Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odor and in hue, Could make me any summer’s story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew. Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white, Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose; They were but sweet, but figures of delight, Drawn after you, you pattern of all those. Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away, As with your shadow I with these did play.

—William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564
Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

From you have I been absent in the spring,
When proud-pied April, dressed in all his trim,
Hath put a spirit of youth in everything,
That heavy Saturn laughed and leaped with him,
Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell
Of different flowers in odor and in hue,
Could make me any summer’s story tell,
Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew.
Nor did I wonder at the lily’s white,
Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose;
They were but sweet, but figures of delight,
Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.
Yet seemed it winter still, and, you away,
As with your shadow I with these did play.

—William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564

Vase of Flowers (detail), 1722, Jan van Huysum. The J. Paul Getty Museum

(via heaveninawildflower)

Contents Under Pressure

ruckawriter:

I rarely use this to just blog. I’m going to just blog now, so you can all just ignore this if it’s not to your liking.

Warning. Contents under pressure.

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File under “reasons I am pretty much always going to cheer for Greg Rucka/reasons that underlie why his work is consistently excellent.”

theimancameron asked: How was it working with Terry Dodson on Wonder Woman? Would you want to work with him again?

lisaquestions:

gailsimone:

This is a weird thing. I love Terry’s work, I think he is brilliant, and Rachel is easily one of the best inkers in comics. Together they are unbeatable.

So here’s what’s weird. I was born in a TINY Oregon town in the middle of nowhere. We have no theater, no bookstore, two stoplights, for years, we didn’t even have Chinese food. It’s remote.

Terry is also from there. So is Rachel.  So a town of 7000 produced the entire core team of Wonder Woman for a while. We all still live in the same town and see each other now and again. I just find it a mind-boggling coincidence.

Anyway, they are lovely people, very kind and soft-spoken, but MAN ARE THEY TALENTED. They both draw like bandits. Rachel only works on Terry’s pencils, but she is still one of the best there is, and Terry is famous for a reason. Working with them on Wonder Woman was a dream come true.

Clearly the mark of destiny.

As an Oregonian, I am SO curious which town.

voyboyfanclub:

so TERF was a term that was obviously coined by trans women and a lot of people know it as meaning “trans exclusionary radical feminist” (and i did too until just recently) but it originally stood for “trans exterminatory radical feminist” and TERFs changed the meaning of it to make it sound less horrible

so in case you needed more reason to hate TERFs there you go have some blatant silencing of trans women

Except, as I recall, it was actually proposed by cis radical feminists who wanted to distance themselves from the radical feminists who are obsessed with rooting out the evil trans women lurking behind every tree, and trans women embraced it.  So that’s a thing, too: a term that was to some degree a collaboration between cis and trans women standing up against transmisogyny that’s been both watered down and further polemicized.

(via navigatethestream)

vicoactus:

p.s. can trans women please reclaim ‘tender’ from those rly not-actually-that-tender trans boys who use “but I’m tender” as a cover story for their shitty dude behavior, like, yesterday?

if anything it’s at a point where when a faab trans person describes themselves as especially tender, I flinch, cause I know some emotional blow is coming soon after

I’m at the point where any time I hear “tenderqueer” my gorge rises.

instvnct:

Show Off : (Lisa Skelton) 

fetishmode:

Zac Posen

deprincessed:

An enchanting Christian Lacroix haute couture layered silk wedding gown with ruffled tulle and a draping veil held in place by a jewel headpiece features in the editorial ‘The Glorious Traditions’ which was photographed by legend Irving Penn for Vogue US December 1995

deprincessed:

An enchanting Christian Lacroix haute couture layered silk wedding gown with ruffled tulle and a draping veil held in place by a jewel headpiece features in the editorial ‘The Glorious Traditions’ which was photographed by legend Irving Penn for Vogue US December 1995

(via divinefruit)

inspirationofelves:

Under her spell - Tribute by Kanthesis

Well.
rollership:

mordmardok- c.1913 - Stones thrown by Suffragettes 
through the Buckingham Palace window

rollership:

mordmardok- c.1913 - Stones thrown by Suffragettes 

through the Buckingham Palace window

(Source: mordmardok, via weunderstandthelights)

atchka:

Ooooooh, purdy.

I get to see someone’s face do this sometimes.

atchka:

Ooooooh, purdy.

I get to see someone’s face do this sometimes.

(Source: theonetrueself, via grrspit)

“We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward, or fix us in the present. We are made up of layers, cells, constellations.”

—   Anais Nin (via cabaretfurs)

(Source: balidomalido, via so-treu)

“Without makeup, my face is just a random pile of tissue, protein, skin cells, and cartilage. The random arrangement of that tissue, protein, and cartilage tells you nothing about my personality because I was simply born with it. Conversely, my makeup is not random at all. *I* chose it. ME. Not nature. Not my gene pool. Not strands of DNA over which I exercise NO CONTROL. Me and my personality chose this routine. And for that reason, makeup is the absolute closest I will get to self-expression on my face without prosthetic body parts. When a guy tells you he prefers you without makeup, he’s sort of telling you that he prefers it when you don’t make choices to advance your identity. He’s telling you that he prefers your body to your brain. Your brain is the reason why you applied that black eyeshadow. Your actual face and body are idle vessels through which you operate, but actually have absolutely NOTHING to do with who you are. So every time you make a decision to clothe your body or put makeup on your face, you’re making the decision to reflect your thoughts through the canvas that is your physical being.”

—   

(via methadrine)

🙌

(via babyyyyfat)

I’m not up for this radical division of mind and body (and devaluation of the body as part of the self) but I’m definitely up for this thing about control and expression and choice and sculpture.

(Source: milksorbet, via femmenos)

BEFORE BATGIRL, WEIRDER THAN WONDER WOMAN: LOST SUPERHEROINES OF THE PRE-CODE ERA

saladinahmed:

As I discussed in an earlier post, pre-Comics Code comic books are full of fascinating women superheroes who’ve been more or less forgotten in the decades since WWII. Born in the era of Rosie the Riveter, when there was a national campaign to get women into workplaces, these costumed heroines were brassy, hard-assed, snarky, and sometimes just plain weird. They displayed remarkable grit and independence, and were portrayed as better crime-fighters than the inept, sexist cops that got in their way.

Even removed from their intriguing, important place in sociocultural history, these stories are compelling bits of pure comics nerdery - eg, the fact that 1941’s Spider Queen was almost certainly the unacknowledged inspiration for Spider-Man. These characters deserve to be better known. Happily, the astonishing www.digitalcomicmuseum.org hosts full-issue scans of scores of public domain pre-Code comics. Which means you can read these comics right now, for free!

Here are a few of my favorite lost superheroines from the 1940s. Click on a character’s name to access an archive of their adventures!

FANTOMAH - Arguably the first woman superhero, and to this day one of the strangest. Fantomah is a near-omniscient (blonde) jungle spirit with incredible magical/psionic powers. She is always threatening her enemies with “a jungle death!” and she turns into a green skull with beautiful hair when she’s angry.

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LADY SATAN - Sometime Nazi-killer, sometime occult detective, Lady Satan roams the land in her stylish automobile, using gun, garrote, and fire magic to take out Reich agents and child-snatching werewolves.

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MOTHER HUBBARD - Looking like a cartoon witch, speaking only in rhyme, Mother Hubbard uses her bizarre occult powers to battle everything from fifth column saboteurs to Disney-esque dwarves that steal kids’ eyeballs.

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THE WOMAN IN RED - A gun-toting jujitsu expert, the Woman in Red is a sort of costumed private detective. She’s the bane of both criminals (especially those who prey on women) and inept male cops. But to the women she saves she’s quite…tender.

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THE SPIDER QUEEN - A chemistry lab assistant becomes a wise-cracking costumed herowho uses wrist-strapped web shooters to swing around the city and tie up bad guys. But this is 1941, and our hero is a woman.

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THE VEILED AVENGER - Although she’s the frilliest-looking of 40s superheroines, the Veiled Avenger might be the hardest. She uses her crop to make criminals shoot each other…and themselves. And in her civilian life as a District Attorney’s secretary, she scolds dumb cops who endanger witnesses.

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Sadly, these heroines all disappeared by the 1950s. As the national project of getting women out of the workplace took hold, bold self-sufficient superheroines became scarce on the ground. Despite some great work by amazing artists over the years, comics still doesn’t have enough of them.

[And now, a plug: I’m working on a longer piece on these heroines, and on some other stuff you might find interesting. You can learn more about all that here.]

This is amazing!

(via ladyofthelog)

Carmen Carrera and Monica Beverly Hillz have a few comments about transphobia on RPDR.

rafi-dangelo:

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Two women who previously appeared as contestants on RuPaul’s Drag Race have commented on the controversy around the “Female vs. She-Male” mini challenge.  Given that RPDR gave Carmen Carrera and Monica Beverly Hillz wider exposure and a larger platform, I hadn’t given much thought to either of these ladies commenting publicly, but they have, and I’m glad we finally have statements from people close to the issue.

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So there.

(via fyqueerlatinxs)